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be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this is obviously a very critical role for the administration and for the american people as a whole. with tim geithner, a lot of people have said he is one of the reasons why things are as shaky as they are righ
] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular error probable of the blast effects of nuclear weapons. here we are today, we have traveled a considerable difference. we have traveled a considerable distance. they didn't say al qaeda or iran or north korea, wh
energy, the same co2 emission. the end of our planet is possible. but there is an enormous chance for us. what they need our products with lower energy consumption. what they need our energy efficient products. who could better develop this than the united states and the europeans, in cooperation together. to combine innovation on climate change with industry and production. that is possible, but only if we are live. therefore i am in favor of a trade agreement. asked what other obstacles there are. a lot of europeans doubting, but i saw better ground here in the united states, in ohio, and i saw for the first time in a swing state, the co2 question played a major role in the election concerning the coal mining question. to avoid any other misunderstanding, i know what it means to close a coal mine for 35,000 inhabitants, most of them employed in the coal mine. when you close down the coal mine, it was an economic disaster. but today, the coal mine is closed down and you have an economically flourishing city. so it is possible to step away from a traditional industrial structure, with pu
of defense has invested significant time and resources into improving our nation's energy security. energy security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently
on the moon, neil armstrong, just before 0:00. -- 11:00. next up, a discussion on u.s. energy policy and the energy grid. spotlighthis week's focus on the jeffrey leonard piece on the future of natural gas and the challenges of an aging electrical grid. jeffrey leonard, start with the first half of this equation and explain what you mean when you say that the natural gas boom could be the biggest game changer in global politics and economics in a generation. guest: things have changed so fast in the energy picture in the united states. a few years ago it seemed that we would need to import large amounts from abroad in order to meet our natural gas supply in this country. today there is so much gas available and more projected to become available in this country that it is creating opportunities for electricity generation for gas, creating opportunities for industries to go back to the united states. chemical, fertilizers, adding large amounts of money back into the economy. the energy picture looks a lot different than it did a few years ago. host: this natural gas boom that we have,
about the energy boom. "washington journal" next. host: good morning, it's wednesday, november 21. president obama returns to the white house this afternoon following his tour of asia. secretary clinton is on the ground in the mideast, meeting with israeli, egyptian, and palestinian officials in an effort to bring an end to the ongoing violence in the gaza strip. yesterday's fed chairman ben bernanke issued warnings to u.s. leaders negotiating over the so- called fiscal cliff about the serious financial impact looming on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, i
journal" and on your program for some time. there is an energy revival in the united states, we know that. it is coming from shale gas, shale oil from fracking in many states. there are environmental issues to consider here. in the meantime, a lot of individuals have leases that they have granted for oil drilling or gas drilling on their private land, most of this is happening on private land so those individuals who own this land are getting income from it. >>shepard: people are flocking to the areas for the jobs. >>guest: north dakota has become a boom state with situations now where there is not enough housing for all of the oil and gas, primarily oil workers coming to the state but it is not just north dakota. the shale oil and gas is positioned all around the united states, in the east, the west coast, and it is ahead in its exploit station in florida and places like the eagle ford field. this is a boom fought to those getting money for the leases they are ranting but lower energy costs. it is like a tax cut for america. >>shepard: if we were to become energy independent, it would ce
in the energy sector a without a carbon tax you are not directly getting back.t >> >> i think you can design one such way that does not cause too much harm for american industries that compete with folks abroad. consumption tax is difficult if you try to do a value added tax. there are things you can do to tweak the income-tax to make it look like a value added tax. >> at the end of the day, what you think the tax code will look like when these conversations between the president and speaker john boehner are done? what will look like when they are done? >> i think we will have slightly higher marginal tax rates on some -- at least one high income tax bracket and i think there will be a variety of tax and exclusions and deductions that are scaled back modestly and that's about it. >> it scaled-back means capt. someone, i agree completely. ." >> i think we will see some of those things rolled back. i think the top rate will be in between 39 and 45%. >> we have some common ground among our economists where we will end up. thank you for joining us and thank you all. i appreciate the pedersen foundat
a little bit of energy into this thing and it becomes explosive. it is all energy driven. but the issue really is not that is what the emerging world with its -- whether it is time a court india up with different perspectives. i've seen china and india in 2004, maybe 2003, the trade was maybe $2 billion between the countries. today, i think this is where the chinese prime minister comes to india and we're talking $150 billion on the next verizon. this is without drawing claims. i think what asia is looking for is that we can have correlations within each other. without necessarily being aided to. it is a dangerous game, but all games are dangerous. kissinger credit a lifetime career out of it. [laughter] this is the way it is. military power is a dominant element of strategy will not work. as a background element of strategy, yes, it's essential, important, including for the first time two years ago, the pentagon had a conference i was there in which we discussed india and american cooperation in the pacific. never happened before. it does not mean [indiscernible] we are taking position
this wholesale gas and oil revolution. we have a path to energy independence in america that is $200 billion deficit right now. it is the bridge to renewable energy, renewable energy will take a long time. if we can move to gas we get tremendous benefits in terms of cleaner energy on the way to renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, steve, this would be transformational for our economy but we have not been able to act on these things even though i said earlier there is wide bipartisan -- >> thank you. let me just try to poke holes in this. if we rollback time to just before the financial crisis you look at the u.s. deposition. douglas holtz-eakin was out there talking about that already. and john mccain and others have been but it is much worse today but if you look at the deck in a different way, look at private sector debt, the fact, forget government debt. before the financial crisis private-sector debt was 160% of gdp in the united states and despite averaging, back to 160% of gdp we are still in crisis mode, you had structural corruption between regulators and finan
. then a guest to discuss his "washington monthly" article about the energy bill. live on c-span every day at 7:30 a.m. eastern. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grant at saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? he did. i am not going to say grant was the only person who saved the union. but he was the commanding general of the army that put lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia under robert e. lee that ended the war. if anybody one of the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you cannot, but one of the things we do when history is we generalize, we simplify, because history and reality are simply too complicated to get our heads around if we deal with it in its full complexity. so gramm save the union during the civil war. i do contend that grant saved the union during reconstruction as well. >> from obscurity in illinois to a courthouse in appomattox and 1600 pennsylvania avenue, the light of ulysses s. grant, thursday night. part of b
-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ >>> lots more coming up from our powerhse r >>> lots more coming up from our powerhouse roundtable and ben affleck after this from our abc station. stations. our powerhouse roundtable and ben affleck after this from our abc station. >>> lots more cominr powerhouse roundtable and ben affleck after this from our abc station. ♪ >>> i'm so happy to be joined by secretary clinton. this is her last foreign trip that we're going to take together. it's fitting that we come to a country that she's done so much to support. i could not be more grateful not only for your service, hillary, but also for the powerful message that you sent about the importance of women and men everywhere embracing and promoting democratic values and human rights. >> shuttling diplomacy this week, hillary clinton, we'll
look at the health effects of energy drinks. investors are betting a looming crackdown on the industry may be overblown. >>> in the wake of apple's recent apology for the failings of its mapping app, a second employee involved in its mapping operations has reportedly been fired. >>> more than 15,000 of these step 2 children's riding toys are being recalled because kids who lean too far forward on the seat can go over the handle bars. >>> "consumer reports" is out with its third annual naughty and nice list. so retailers nordstrom and kohl's get a thumbs up, that's thanks to their hassle free return policies, while airlines delta and spirit get a lump of coal for their costly upgrades and add-on fees. >>> for the second year in a row california's debt has put the golden state at the bottom of 24/7 wall street's annual 50 state financial health check. and for the first time north dakota tops the list. that's thanks to an oil and gas boon that's wiped out its budget deficit and brought unemployment to the lowest in the nation. >>> all right, coming up, a basketball roundup, and rememberin
, energy, public safety, government performance, elections, broadband wired and wireless is transforming everything. it's already a game changer, and we're still in the early innings of this new communication technology. now, these opportunities, where we are in the curve of the technology and the opportunities, this is known around the world. when i meet with my international counterparts in every region of the world, they are focused on the opportunities of broadband. each of our global competitors wants to become a 21st century hub for broadband related innovation. and in today's flat the global economy where capital can float anywhere and innovation can work anywhere, we have to acknowledge that u.s. leadership going forward is not a given. it's something that we have to earn a new every day. and u.s. broadband leadership is particularly vital as developing countries grow and to middle-class expands around the world. these are good developments, but we should embrace them as the spur to our global competitiveness to ensure that we have in the u.s. world leading broadband infrastructu
have with the department of education, with the department of energy, i can go down the list, but rick, the reason why i don't want obamacare on the table. it will politicize this process, in 2010 congress had referendum on obamacare and that's why the republicans took over and we don't need to politicize the issue, but also, we need to perform entitlement programs. i know it's not a great issue to discuss, but programs are going to go bankrupt so we need to reform welfare, we need to reform medicare, medicaid, we need to cut spending. and that's why we should start. >> mark, i know that democrats would love to start with the pentagon as far as cutting spending, but what about entitlement reform? do the democrats need to be willing to sit down at the table and talk about some of their sacred cows? >> yeah, democrats are going to have to cut things that are uncomfortable for democrats to cut just like republicans will. >> rick: like what? >> as you mentioned, well, let me first take issue with something that angela said, education, i don't know whether she characterizes that as entitlem
. it is time to restore my energy. the president and i were joking about how bad i looked. it is time to take a vacation. >> what did you say about how he looks? >> i said i thought he looked great. [laughter] >> as a possible you will go into the white house? >> i have done that. i back to work on health care. i think my future is probably outside the white house helping him becoming part of whatever happens to our social movement to advocate for his agenda. >> it is up -- possible you would run about love for america on the outside. >> what we have to do first is have a discussion about what our people want to do. >> what is the horizon for making decisions about that? >> you will see us make decisions by the and not grow. that is natural. that is what we did last time. last time everybody thought we were going to do one thing. i do not think on election day we expect it to do that but we had discussions with our people and ended up doing that. it is clear healthcare would not have passed without that decision. >> the amazing thing the obama campaign has done, you were the first presidentia
talked about on cbs, nbc, cnn, or any of the networks. he just announced that he can do an energy tax tomorrow and not have broken his word. an energy tax, wacking the middle class. he could raise income taxes on people a year from now. which is why what he wanted to do is kick out the bush rates for those making less $250,000 a year. this is where you talk about the dual mandate. we are talking about marginal tax rates, higher income people and successful small businesses. that raises $400 billion -- there are other taxes, in addition to the rate increases he wants to include. over a decade. he has $800 billion he plans to raise from higher income people. the size of the debt -- if he gets that, in his budget, assuming he gets the tax hike -- he raises $8 trillion in debt over the next decade. having solved less than 10% of the problem, he then comes back and says, now, who is going to pay the $8 trillion? that is the energy tax. which, of course, the treasury department -- carbon in e-mails several thousand -- are the typing it out on carbon paper? you cannot turn the united states
energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas... putting us in control of our energy future, now. >>> the united states could now be considering sending more military power into the middle east in the wake of this latest wave of violence. let's bring in our pentagon correspondent barbara starr. what are you learning, barbara? >> well, wolf, a number of senior u.s. military officials tell us there are now discussions here inside the pentagon at very top levels about whether more military power is needed in the region because of the instability. one official telling us this is post-benghazi. the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. and now in addition problems of rising tensions all over the region, syria, israel, gaza, egypt. look at that map. that tells you exactly where this all starts.
white house economist, alan krueger, he's here in "the situation room." all energy development comes with some risk, but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as... -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard
of the department of education, get rid of the department of energy or whatever. no, reform government so it costs less. 100,000 kids in arizona will now have a $5,000 voucher, they can take to a public school, a private school, a parochial school, home school, if they don't spend it -- >> so you're saying -- >> you don't need more money, you need reforms. we've given the post office -- would allowing fedex and u.p.s. to deliver mail make your post office mail get their sooner? >> this is one of the questions on the card. when you leave here very shortly you're going to go to your wednesday meeting. this is a literal meeting of the right wing conspiracy, right? >> about this size. >> this is a weekly meeting that you've had -- >> some of the people from there are here. [laughter] i see you. >> so this is a weekly meeting of what you call the center right coalition. you have similar meetings, 60 of them, in 48 states, around the country. and this is a place where members of congress, people from think tanks, people who generally agree get together to kind of open mike, there's 150 people, sometimes
passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves his time. >> mr. speaker, i reser
for the spoof. stay with us. you're in "the situation room." while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ i'm going to dream about that steak. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. i put away
-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >> shepard: lawsuits. four women service members with the help of the american civil liberties union, today sued the pentagon challenging the military's ban on women serving in certain combat positions. since 1994, women have not formally been allowed to serve in ground combat units. those units are considered more dangerous because they're often in the line of fire for extended periods of time. it's worth noting that women have served on the front lines in iraq and afghanistan, but most often in support roles. in fact, women make up 14% of our 1.5 million active military personnel. this lawsuit claims the current combat policy prevents women from promotions and salary bonuses that are open to men in combat. >>> israel is facing a setback at the united nations as france is announcing it plans to vote for palestinian statehood. the u.n. general assembly set to vote on this day after tomorrow on whether to recognize a palestinian state. france is the first major europe
fat just under the skin. >>> and shares for monster energy drink are seeing a monster 13% spike after the fda decided not to take any immediate action against makers of the caffeinated drinks. last month the fda said it was investigating reports of five deaths which could be linked to the drink. the fda did consider pushing for warnings and more information on drink labels like caffeine content, possible side effects after it finishes a safety review. >>> the kansas city chiefs' runningback jamaal charles is feeling the heat after a camera saw him asking for peyton manning's autograph. he said the autograph was for his mom. >> even if it was for him, leave him alone. >>> time for your local news making national headlines this morning. no one wants cell phone towers in their yard, so they are turning to a higher authority in california. the san francisco chronicle reporting a growing number of churches leasing space in their steeples for cell attenthat nae. it pays $4,000 a month. >>> all right. do you think bald is beautiful? i do. now it is downright profitable as well. the "new york
to it. i think there was a sense like on energy and environment and education that the president had a vision for where america needs to be in this new century where we've got rising competition in china and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to
make them write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. >> shepard: well, u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice is about to face some of her most vocal critics on capitol hill. she is set to meet with republic senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelli eye yacht tomorrow according to senator mccain's office. the senator expects a lot of questions to be answered. analysts say president obama may nominate ambassador rice to be secretary of state and he may do so as soon as this week. the senators had said that she i
engel is a member of the energy and commerce committee and recently wrote a letter to fred upton, the chairman of the commerce committee, hoping to hold hearings on telecommunications and sandy. representative engel, what's your goal with those hearings? >> guest: well, you know, my district, as most districts in the new york, were disrupted by hurricane sandy. and when we look at the disruption, it's clear that telecommunications services were one of the key services that failed to perform. and so, um, we want to have a hearing just to find out what went wrong and what we can do to insure in the future that the same thing doesn't happen again. the fcc reported that the storm knocked out a quarter of the cell towers in an area spreading across ten states, and people lost wireless, it's, -- television, telephone and internet services. and, obviously, it puts lives at risk, and it's clear there either wasn't correct preparation, or we were caught by surprise. so this is not something that we want to happen again. the purpose of this hearing would not be to point any fingers, it wou
his eyes open during the meeting. 5 hour energy all around, kids. >> alisyn: you can not fault hillary clinton with that travel schedule. talk about a wild encounter, we take to you texas for this one. two men were walking to a car when a deer attacked them. he jumped into the bed of the pick up and called police. >> he put his front paws on my feet, got my pack of cigarettes and started chewing them. he broke a police officer's rib, kicked a police officer in the leg. >> alisyn: the animal also caused some damage to the truck. it took more than five men to get the deer under control. >> steve: you don't hear much about how deer are apparently hooked on nicotine down there. >> alisyn: right. >> brian: remember the deer that came alive in that movie with -- in tommy boy. that's why i don't go deer hunting, you don't know when they're angry or dead. let's talk boxing. bad boxing story. former world champion hector camacho shot a bunch of times. in critical condition in his native puerto rico. he was hit in the neck, face while he was sitting in a car. a man next to him not so good. dead.
american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. [ male announcer ] the way it moves. the way it cleans. everything about the oral-b power brush is simply revolutionary. oral-b power brushes oscillate, rotate and even pulsate to gently loosen and break up that sticky plaque with more brush movements than manual brushes and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. >>> some of the secrets surrounding osama bin laden's burial at sea are being revealed, and sensitive navy e-mails
. but i hope we can marshal the energy and create -- i think there's an extraordinary opportunity. i think we can turn that longevity paired docs into a fast payoff and i think the analogy is the movement of so many women into new roles in the 60's and 70's. at that point we were thinking as a society, this is going to be a zero-sum proposition. how we accommodate all this talent. we will simply displace men and end up at the same place that we started only with a lot of conflict along the way. now we know we would be never be competitive without that enormous source of talent. down the road we will feel the same way about the segment of population. i think there'll be lots of surprises as well. we can't write off the talent and experience of this group but even more we tend to underestimate the creativity and and -- david gallas and he studied creativity said creativity across the life course. he said the value of every significant painting that was sold over the last 100 years and as they looks at the patterns of this artwork more strongly than anything else was that the most valuable wo
it is energy, money, time, associated with every component of our educational institution. given this reality, every component has to be evaluated based on what is the return on investment of educational dollars, including football. so how do you do that? you have got to go to the justifications we have been using for a century for football's place with an educational institutions. we have to be honest, the primary justification was to socialize and immigrant workforce. the other part of it is the great industrialists at the turn of the century were introduced to football as a way to train a workforce for the industrial economy. they wanted folks who were physically fit, took directions, were obedient. there was not much room for lofty thinking on the assembly line. have to ask the question, is as a primary justification we are trying to instill in our schools for an industrial economy? we no longer live in an industrial society. and the other justification we have used for years -- and i do believe this justification -- is that football is an educational tool. it builds character, discipline
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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